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The Future of Alaska's Salmon Returns

April 21, 2003
8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Commons 107
University of Alaska Anchorage
Anchorage, Alaska, USA

Contact: Paula Cullenberg or Dr. Milo Adkison

The success of Alaska's wild salmon fishery ultimately depends on the amount of fish available to harvest, and the intensity and duration of fluctuations in run strength. Hardships due to market conditions are exacerbated if salmon returns are weak. This workshop focused on what the future holds for run strengths of Alaska's salmon populations statewide. Recent and prehistoric changes in run sizes, their possible causes, our ability to predict returns, and the effects of fluctuations on fisheries were examined. The causes of declines in the Pacific Northwest were also discussed.


Presentations

(The following are PDFs created from PowerPoint presentations)

The future of Alaska’s salmon returns
Milo Adkison (473 K)

Changes in sockeye salmon populations over the past 2,200 years: Inferences from lake sediments
Irene Gregory-Eaves
Low-res PDF, part 1 (845 K)
Low-res PDF, part 2 (1.7 MB)

Why we need to think about the long-term outlook for Alaska’s salmon returns
Gunnar Knapp ( 60 K)

El Niño, climate change, and Alaska salmon production
Nathan Mantua (1.4 MB)

Variation in survival rates of salmon stocks across space and time
Randall Peterman (236 K)

Salmon and society: Lessons from the Pacific Northwest
Robin Waples
Low-res PDF (3.82 MB)
PowerPoint presentation (2 MB)
PowerPoint vertical slides (355 K)

Abstracts

Abstracts and speaker bios (338 K PDF)

(Where available, the titles below are linked to abstracts in Microsoft Word)

Future salmon abundance in Alaska: An overview
Milo Adkison, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Changes in sockeye salmon populations over the past 2,200 years: Inferences from lake sediments
Irene Gregory-Eaves, University of Ottowa

Effects of salmon fluctuations on fisheries
Gunnar Knapp, University of Alaska Anchorage

El Niño, climate change, and Pacific salmon production: A review of the ways that changes in climate and ocean conditions impact salmon productivity and a look at scenarios of future climate and salmon populations
Nathan Mantua, University of Washington

Variation in survival rates of salmon stocks across space and time: How much of it can we expect to explain or forecast?
Randall Peterman, Simon Fraser University

The cause of salmon declines—the Pacific NW experience
Robin Waples, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA

speakers at workshop
Left to right: Nathan Mantua, University of Washington; Robin Waples, National Marine Fisheries Service; Irene Gregory-Eaves, University of Ottawa; Randall Peterman, Simon Fraser University; Gunnar Knapp, University of Alaska Anchorage. (Courtesy Doug Schneider, Alaska Sea Grant)
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