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August 26, 2004

SFOS researchers publish study of fish protein powders

Underutilized arrowtooth and herring subject of study

Kodiak, Alaska—SFOS scientists are among the authors of research appearing in the August 2004 issue of Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Dr. Subramaniam Sathivel, assistant professor of seafood processing and engineering at the SFOS Fishery Industrial Technology Center (FITC) in Kodiak and Dr. Peter Bechtel with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Seafood Laboratory at SFOS, together with others, published "Properties of Protein Powders from Arrowtooth Flounder (Atheresthes stomias) and Herring (Clupea harengus) Byproduct."

Their studies were conducted at FITC and were supported in part by the Alaska Fisheries Byproducts Utilization Program, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service.

A total of 32,509 metric tons of herring (Clupea harengus) was harvested in Alaska in 2000. The majority of herring harvested in Alaska is for herring roe, a valuable commodity known as "Kazunoko" in the Japanese market. The male and female herring are often made into in fish meal. There is more than 2.8 million tons of arrowtooth flounder (Atheresthes stomias) in the Gulf of Alaska, but little of it is used for food because the flesh turns to mush during cooking process.

USDA supported scientists worked to utilize herring byproducts and arrowtooth flounder flesh in fish protein powders (FPPs) that could be potentially used as functional ingredients and nutrition supplements.

Scientists in this study produced protein powders from herring byproducts and arrowtooth flounder and evaluated attributes such as nutritional, physical, and thermal properties. Physical properties including emulsifying capacity, emulsifying stability, fat adsorption capacity, and nitrogen solubility of the FPPs were higher than soy protein concentration. FPP samples exceeded the essential amino acid requirements for adult humans.

The FPP was a good source of high quality fish protein and could compete industrially with other protein powders such as soy protein isolate and egg albumin. The functional properties of the FPPs could be used as emulsifiers and gelling agents. This study identifies opportunities to develop value-added products from Alaska fish processing byproducts.

Reference:
Sathivel, S., P. J. Bechtel, J. Babbitt, W. Prinyawiwatkul, I. I. Negulescu, and K.D. Reppond. 2004. Properties of Protein Powders from Arrowtooth Flounder (Atheresthes stomias) and Herring (Clupea harengus) Byproduct. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 52:5040-5046.

Scientists involved in this research:

Dr. Subramaniam Sathivel, Assistant Professor of Seafood Processing and Engineering, SFOS/FITC

Dr. Peter J. Bechtel, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Seafood Laboratory, SFOS

Dr. Jerry Babbitt, Director, NMFS Utilization Research Laboratory, SFOS/FITC

Dr. Witoon Prinyawiwatkul, Associate Professor of Food Science, Department of Food Science, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Dr. Ioan I. Negulescu, Professor, School of Human Ecology and Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Kermit Reppond, NMFS Utilization Research Laboratory, SFOS/FITC


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