A Photo of  Jeremy Mathis

Contact Information

Institute of Marine Science
333 Irving II
P.O. Box 757220
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Fairbanks, AK 99775-7220
Phone: (907) 474-5926
jtmathis@alaska.edu

Jeremy Mathis Adjunct Professor

Chemical Oceanography

Affiliations

Specialties

  • Marine Chemistry
  • Biogeochemical Processes
  • Ecosystem Dynamics
  • Carbon Cycle
  • Nitrogen Cycle

Education

  • B.S. McNeese State University (Chemical Engineering)
  • Ph.D. 2006 University of Miami (Oceanography)

Research Overview

The main focus of my research is the cycling and fate of carbon and nitrogen in the marine environment and how they affect the ecosystem. During photosynthesis, autotrophic organisms such as phytoplankton consume dissolved inorganic carbon in the upper ocean and produce organic carbon as a byproduct. This inorganic carbon is converted to either dissolved or particulate organic carbon which is retained in the surface ocean, or exported to greater depths. The organic carbon is then returned to its inorganic constituents through a process called remineralization by heterotrophic organisms; thus completing the cycle.

Measuring the consumption of inorganic carbon (primary production/net ecosystem production) and the production of organic carbon gives an indication of how the ecosystem is behaving in a certain region. Many environmental factors can influence net ecosystem productivity, and because this process is the basis of the food-web it can have dramatic consequences to higher trophic level organisms such as fish, birds, marine mammals, and humans.

Most of my work in marine biogeochemisty takes place in the Arctic Ocean, the Bering Sea, and the Gulf of Alaska. I am also interested in terrestrial processes (river runoff, coastal erosion, etc.) in the Arctic that impact the marine ecosystem.

Along with the consumption and production of carbon and nitrogen in the ocean I am also interested in how they are transported from one region to another. This has led me to study eddies in several different parts of the world. Some of these eddies are responsible for moving organic carbon and nitrogen produced over continental shelves into a deep ocean basin (i.e. Chukchi Sea in the Arctic Ocean) while others are responsible for large scale inter-ocean exchanges of carbon (i.e. Agulha Rings in the South Atlantic/Indian Ocean).

Current Research Projects

  • Arctic Shelf Basin Interactions Project: Phase III

Links

Selected Publications

Peer-Reviewed Publications

  1. Mathis, J.T., Hansell, D.A., Bates, N.R. (2005) Strong hydrographic controls on spatial and seasonal variability of dissolved organic carbon in the Chukchi Sea (Deep-Sea Research II, 52, 3245-3258).
  2. Bates, N.R., Moran, S.B., Hansell, D.A., Mathis, J.M. (2006).  An increasing CO2 sink in the Arctic Ocean due to sea-ice loss?  (Geophys. Res. Letters., 33, L23609).
  3. Mathis, J.T., Pickart, R.S., Hansell, D.A., Kadko, D., Bates, N.R. (2007a).  Eddy transport of organic carbon and nutrients from the Chukchi Shelf:  Impact on the upper halocline of the western Arctic Ocean. (J. of Geophys. Res. 112, C05011, doi: 10.1029/2006JC003899).
  4. Mathis, J.T., Hansell, D.A. Kadko, D., Bates, N.R., Cooper, L.W (2007b).  Determining net dissolved organic carbon production in the hydrographically complex western Arctic Ocean.  (Limnol. Oceanogr., 52(5), 1789–1799).

Manuscripts In Press

  1. Lepore, K., Moran, S.B., Grebmeier, J. M., Cooper, L.W., Lalande, C., Maslowski, W., Hill, V., Bates, N.R., Hansell, D.A., Mathis, J.T., Kelly, R.P.  Seasonal and interannual changes in POC export and deposition in the Chukchi Sea.  (Journal of Geophysical Research, 2007).
  2. Mathis, J.T., Bates, N.R., Hansell, D.A., Babila, T.  Interannual Variability of Net Community Production Over the Northeast Chukchi Sea Shelf (Deep Sea Research II).
  3. Llinas, L., Smith, S., Mathis, J.T., Weingartner, T.J. The effects of eddy transport on zooplankton biomass and community composition in the western Arctic.  (Deep Sea Research II).
  4. Kadko, D., Pickart, R.S., Mathis, J.T., Age Characteristics of a Shelf-Break Eddy in the Western Arctic and Implications for Shelf-Basin Exchange.  (Journal of Geophysical Research).

Manuscripts In Review

  1. Mathis, J.T., Hansell, D.A., Bates, N.R., Byrne, D.A., Beal, L.M., Duncombe Rae, C., Interbasin Transport of Anthropogenic CO2 in the Agulhas Current System.  (Geophysical Research Letters).
      
    Other Publications and Reports  
    Book Review
  1. Mathis, J.T. and D.A. Hansell (2004). The Organic Carbon Cycle in the Arctic Ocean by R. Stein and R.W. Macdonald (eds.) Springer. Marine Chemistry 91, 253-254.

Abstracts

  1. Mathis, J.T., Swift, J.H., Hansell, D.A., SBI data comparison for 2002-2003: Temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, and silicate at repeated sections in the western Arctic, ASLO/TOS Ocean Sciences Meeting, Honolulu, Hawaii, February 2004.
  2. Mathis, J.T., Hansell, D.A., Kadko, D., Bates, N.R., Pickart, R.S.   Eddy Transport of Carbon from the Chukchi Sea Into The Western Arctic Ocean, ASLO Conference, Santiago, Spain, June 2005.
  3. Mathis, J.T., Hansell, D.A., Bates, N.R., Byrne, D.A., Beal, L.M., Duncombe Rae, C., Carbon in the Agulhas Current and Ring System:  Transport Between Major Ocean Basins.  ASLO/TOS Ocean Sciences Meeting, Honolulu, Hawaii, February 2006.
  4. Mathis, J.T., Hansell, D.A., Kadko, D., Bates, N.R., Eddy Transport of Carbon in the Western Arctic Ocean and the Biogeochemical Preconditioning Necessary for Shelf-Basin Exchange. ASLO/TOS Ocean Sciences Meeting, Honolulu, Hawaii, February 2006.
  5. Kadko, D., Pickart, R.S., Mathis, J.T., Weingartner, T.J.,  Age Characteristics of a  
     Shelf-Break Eddy in the Western Arctic and Implications for Shelf-Basin Exchange.
    ASLO/TOS Ocean Sciences Meeting, Honolulu, Hawaii, February 2006.

Workshops Attended

  1. OCCC Planning Meeting – Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, 2005 and 2006.
  2. SOLAS Summer School – Institut Scientifiques de Cargèse in Corsica, France. 2005.
  3. Arctic Terrestrial and Freshwater Ecosystems Summer School, Fairbanks, Alaska. 2006.