student listing

A Photo of  Thomas Farrugia

Contact Information

Fisheries Academic Program
147A O'Neill
P.O. Box 757220
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Fairbanks, AK 99775-7220
Phone: (907) 474-2456
Fax: (907) 474-7204
tjfarrugia@alaska.edu

Thomas FarrugiaPh.D. Student

Fisheries

Thesis Title

Interdisciplinary Sustainability Evaluation of a Skate Fishery in the Gulf of Alaska

Career Goals

I am concerned with the state of subsistence fisheries worldwide, especially in developing countries where little management or advocacy is being carried on behalf of the local fishers. Local┬ápopulations have a wealth of traditional knowledge about the resources, but that resource is frequently being depleted by large international fishing operations happening offshore. I would like to work with local and international fishers to put in place management practices that will ensure the continued sustainable use of marine living resources.

Education

  • B.S. 2005 McGill University (Biology)
  • M.S. 2010 California State University - Long Beach (Marine Biology)

Research Overview

I am interested in movement patterns and population structures of exploited populations and how they are influenced by environmental factors. Relating this to fisheries and how modern and traditional fishers find their catch will optimize stock assessments and make regulations more efficient. Specifically, I will be working with elasmobranchs, both as bycatch and target species, including the developing fishery for big (Raja binoculata) and longnose skates (Raja rhina) in the Gulf of Alaska. In addition, I am interested in the cultural aspects of historical elasmobranch subsistence fishing.

Links

Publications

Farrugia T.J., M. Espinoza, C.G. Lowe. Abundance, habitat use and movement patterns of the shovelnose guitarfish (Rhinobatos productus) in a restored southern California estuary. Manuscript under review for publication in Marine and Freshwater Research

Espinoza M., T.J. Farrugia, D.M. Webber, Smith F., C.G. Lowe. Testing a new acoustic telemetry to quantify long-term, fine-scale movements of aquatic animals. Manuscript under review for publication in Canadian Journal of Aquatic and Fisheries Science.

Hendry A.P., T.J. Farrugia, M.T. Kinnison. Human influences on rates of phenotypic change in wild animal populations. Molecular Ecology 2008 17(1): 20-29.

Skelly D.K., L.N. Joseph, H.P. Possingham, L.K. Freidenburg, T.J. Farrugia, M.T. Kinnison, A.P. Hendry. Evolutionary responses to climate change. Conservation Biology 2007 21(5): 1353-1355.